Kevin L. Nichols

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Hillary Clinton’s Visit to the Bay Area on January 8, 2016

HFA_1.8_Afternoon_SanFranciscoFamily

 

Friday January 8th

 

A Conversation with Hillary Clinton

2:00PM – 4:00PM

At the home of Diana Nelson

San Francisco, CA

$2,700 per person

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/events/tickets/1125176/?raiser=316968

 

 

 

A Family Celebration with Hillary Clinton

3:30PM – 5:30PM

Family ticket prices:

$5,400 primary (Admission and family photo with Hillary Clinton for two adults and children under 16)

$2,700 (two adults, children under 16)

$1,000 (one adult, one child under 16)

$500 individual ticket (limited availability)

Cohosts raise $10,000 (includes Family Photo with Hillary Clinton)

Innovation Hangar, San Francisco, CA

Address provided upon RSVP

RSVP to llassman@hillaryclinton.com, or call 202-215-0627.

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/events/tickets/1124922/?raiser=316968

 

 

 

 

An Evening Reception with Hillary Clinton

6:30PM-8:30PM

$2,700 per person

Cohosts raise $27,000

Home of Sarah and Greg Sands, Palo Alto, CA

Address provided upon RSVP

RSVP to mtrambley@hillaryclinton.com or call 562-256-5396.

https://www.hillaryclinton.com/events/tickets/1124160/?raiser=316968

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Not Giving Up When You See The End

KLN Nike App

By: Kevin L. Nichols – The Social Engineer

[October 19, 2015]  EL CERRITO.  Last weekend, I was in New York celebrating the 25th Anniversary of an organization that I was apart of in high school called Summer Search, Inc. The program inherently took underrepresented minorities, recent immigrants, low income students, etc., to experience a life changing excursion during either the summer of their sophomore or junior year (or both). These excursions could include backpacking and camping in a foreign country or state, attending a competitive boarding school far away, or learning a foreign language abroad, to name a few, all for free.

To celebrate the triumph of this organization, we had an alumni summit where over 200 alumni came together to learn about where the organization is now, how they can get more involved, and walk away with some useful professional development to assist them in their careers. One distinguished alum, Robert Reffkin, a former White House Fellow, Chief of Staff of the President & CEO of Goldman Sachs, and now Founder & CEO of a real estate start-up call Compass, talked about in addition to all of his accomplishments, how he’s run a marathon in every state of the Union. I was amazed and astonished to hear about this feat and wondered what kind of discipline, dedication, and determination must have gone into it.  I recalled completing my first HALF marathon a few years ago and realized what that meant to me personally.  After the pain and exhaustion surpassed, it was just me, the finish-line, and my will.

Lately, I have been traveling a lot and have been a slacker on exercising.  For some reason, I felt determined that I would start running my 5ks on Monday’s and Friday’s again after hearing Robert’s analogies about running marathons and life in general.  He said:

  1. Training IS the marathon (the preparation is where the hard work is);
  2. Run Slow to Run Fast (many people start out too fast and don’t know how to pace themselves); and
  3. Nobody succeeds alone (having people in the crowd supporting you makes all of the difference).
Robert Reffkin - Founder & CEO of Compass - Summer Search Alum

Robert Reffkin – Founder & CEO of Compass – Summer Search Alum

Today, I ran my first 5k in weeks. I was very sluggish and tired. Many times I wanted to quit along the way.  It was about 68 degrees, a mild breeze, a clear sky and a beautiful day.  As I ran with my Nike app tracking my distance and I listened to some old school hip hop and R&B on my headphones, I made some connections in my mind.  I thought about, how often do we quit even though we know when then end is near?  I knew how far 5k was but almost gave up. I decided to push myself until the end and reached my goal. I’m not saying that it wasn’t hard, but I realized that far too often we set goals, know what, when, and how to make them happen, but give up n them because of fear, lack of preparation, discipline, or just not knowing how to pace ourselves endurance wise. My message to you, my friends, is don’t give up. You know where you are going and how to get there. Just get there.

Kevin L. Nichols is an entrepreneur, a legal technology, diversity, social media, and political consultant who resides in the Bay Area.  He is a passionate community organizer and activist.  Kevin is affectionately known as The Social Politician and The Social Engineer™ who is engineering a better life for the next generation, socially.  For more information, please visit www.kevinlnichols.com.

Notice Who is Watching

 

 

Afternoon Concert featuring President Obama and Kanye West in San Francisco

Please come out and support the Democratic National Committee’s Democratic Hope Fund at this afternoon concert featuring special guest, President Barack Obama, and musical performance by Kanye West and Saturday, October 10, 2015 at the Warfield Theater (982 Market Street) in San Francisco.

Prices for attendance: $250 General Admission; $1000 Premium Seating; $5000 Photo with President Barack Obama (each additional person $1000/individual) and; $10,000 for VIP Reception with President Barack Obama.

Please visit  http://bit.ly/1NZItRW  to purchase your tickets.  Many thanks.

POTUS SF Concert Invitation 10-10-15 100152204

What if it Wasn’t About Us?

Engineering a new paradise!

Engineering a new paradise!

By: Kevin L. Nichols – The Social Engineer

[May 20, 2015]  EL CERRITO.  Today, I wanted to take the time to write down my thoughts about a couple of revelations that I had.  Most people do not know that I listen to Our Daily Bread each morning before I start my day.  The message was about discipleship, congregations following pastors and leaders of the church versus the person who those leaders follow, Jesus Christ.  I thought about the rituals that I do on a daily basis, why I do them, and who should get the glory.  I couldn’t help but wonder if people attribute the actions that I choose to me as a human being or do they properly attribute them to our Lord and Savior.  If there is ambiguity, I wanted to make this point abundantly clear.

I wake up each morning with the hope of improving the lives of others.  Although it may seem complicated, I share my runs and work outs via social media not because I want to brag about what I am doing, but to motivate and inspire others to go out and do the same.   I cannot tell you how many inbox messages I get from people stating that my check-ins, my hikes, or running has made the difference in them getting physically fit and/or taking their health more seriously. Sometimes, I just want to rest, sleep, and relax.  Similarly, I share motivational quotes, tips on relationships, and humor to uplift their souls.  Could people think that this is about me building my brand?  What am I doing to lead people to Christ?

Checking in at church on Sundays is not enough.  Thus, although I enjoy what I do each day, I do not do it for my own personal gain.  I do it because it is what I am called to do.  I am in the process of engineering a new generation built on the foundation of love, leadership, activism, and altruism.  The Social Engineering Project is coming soon and hope that you all are ready for a much needed revolution of rebuilding our communities so that they are stronger than ever.  Wouldn’t it be nice to have a slice of heaven or paradise on Earth while we are still here?  I hope that you will join me in this plight.

Kevin L. Nichols is an entrepreneur, a legal technology, diversity, social media, and political consultant who resides in the Bay Area.  He is a passionate community organizer and activist.  Kevin is affectionately known as The Social Politician and The Social Engineer™ who is engineering a better life for the next generation, socially.  For more information, please visitwww.kevinlnichols.com.

 

 

Changing the conversation from diversity (the noun) to inclusion (as a verb) in tech!

Building an All-In Bay Area event

Building an All-In Bay Area event

By: Kevin L. Nichols – The Social Engineer

 

[April 22, 2015] OAKLAND.  Thanks to the Rev. Jesse Jackson, there has recently been a lot of talk about technology and its lack of diversity.  Some of the Silicon Valley tech giants have pledged to do something about the disparities of underrepresented minorities, women, LGBT, persons with disabilities, veterans, etc., however, it seems that there has been a lot more “talk” going on but little action.

 

Vator Splash is taking place today and tomorrow in Oakland.  Vator, Inc.’s mission is “to help great entrepreneurs find funding, and for investors to get in on the ground floor of tomorrow’s leading companies.  There a lot of workshops and seminars designed to marry entrepreneurs with investors, which in theory, will provide opportunities for underrepresented groups to have access to the tech world, but does not affect the tech giants or more mature startups disparities in the valley.  Similarly, the PushTech 2020 Summit will take place on May 6th.  This event will feature more panels regarding funding opportunities, a pitch competition, and supplier diversity opportunities for small businesses.  Nevertheless, at first blush, these events are not targeted at having a significant impact on moving the needle from diversity being the noun, versus inclusion being the verb in changing the face of Silicon Valley to reflect at least the population of the Bay Area, the State of California, or the nation.

 

Not everyone has the determination, motivation, creativity, and other qualities needed to be a successful entrepreneur.  Moreover, there is this misnomer that everyone who works at a startup in Silicon Valley is right out of college, with a computer science or engineering degree, or a coder.  There are numerous other jobs in tech that are not just hardcore science related jobs, such as sales, HR, recruiting, accounting, legal, real estate, etc. and increasing diversity in these areas makes tech more inclusive.

 

The way that I see it, there are three areas of focus in order to make the tech world more inclusive:

 

  1. Pipeline – Tech companies need to fund nonprofit organizations designed to encourage youth to pursue careers involving math, science, and engineering (AKA STEM).  There are many notable organizations such as my friends, Kimberly Bryant’s Black Girls Code, Kalimah Priforce’s Qeyno Labs, and Wayne Sutton’s BUILDUP that are making a tremendous impact inspiring youth to pursue technology.  Moreover, my friend, Professor Bryan Brown and I have partnered to expose 11-12 year olds to math and science at Stanford University’s Science in the City camp and I am planning a STEM related camping conference this fall for a 150 high school students.  Investing in the future creates the necessary pipeline to have underrepresented groups at the table when it is time to hire eligible talent.
  2. Seeking and Retaining Eligible Talent –  It is not enough to recruit at a few Black colleges, all women colleges, etc., tech companies need to also seek these individuals out at the mainstream institutions that they recruit at.  Furthermore, they need to have a retention policy/plan in place to make these underrepresented groups (which some make up 1% of the workforce based on the study referenced earlier in some cases) feel welcome and included.  At least Affirmative Action gave employers incentives to consider diverse talent before hiring them.  Tech now needs its own version of the Rooney Rule , which requires National Football League teams to interview minority candidates for head coaching and senior football operation jobs.
  3. Retraining Those Suffering From Age Discrimination – Surprisingly, if you are 38 or older, you are “over the hill” in Silicon Valley.  There is a huge disparity of age in tech, where older job seekers feel that they are overlooked for opportunities.  Although the younger generation has moved away from Facebook and Twitter to Snapchat and Vine, older (in this case 38+) are capable of learning coding, software languages, IT, etc., in addition to the traditional skills like accounting, finance, HR, management, legal, etc. The tech industry needs to soften it’s emphasis on the “hip culture” of t-shirts and khakis at work, playing volleyball at lunch, and the like and diversify its workforce with people that can still get the job done (and have a little fun too!).  This is in-line with President Obama’s New TechHire Initiative to provide pathways for the middle class  to get jobs.

 

Making the tech industry more inclusive has more benefits than meets the eye.  Today, I was fortunate enough to attend an event called “Building An All-In Bay Area” organized by the San Francisco Foundation and sponsored by PolicyLink and USC’s Program for Environmental & Regional Equity.  It basically was a satelite overview of data complied from extensive research on equity, or lack thereof, throughout the Bay Area.  For example, although the racial/ethnic composition is projected to increase until 2040, the Black population is projected to decrease.  Wages grew significantly for middle and high wage workers aged 25-64 from 1979-2012 in the Bay Area, but decreased for lower waged workers.  Lastly, people of color have lower wages and higher unemployment rates. It might be naive, but more inclusivity in the tech industry will allow people of color to earn higher paying jobs, the ability to live in the communities where they work, have their tax paying dollars be applied to the schools that their children will attend, and improve the Bay Area’s overall quality of life.

 

For more information about the study on Equity, please visit http://nationalequityatlas.org.

Kevin L. Nichols is an entrepreneur, a legal technology, diversity, social media, and political consultant who resides in the Bay Area.  He is a passionate community organizer and activist.  Kevin is affectionately known as The Social Politician and The Social Engineer™ who is engineering a better life for the next generation, socially.  For more information, please visit www.kevinlnichols.com.

 

Black Men and Women Leaders in the Bay Area

Black Men and Women Leaders in the Bay Area

Dinner with President Obama in San Francisco on February 13, 2015

02-15-2015 Obama Page 1

[February 2, 2015] SAN FRANCISCO – Please join the California Democratic Party and President Barack Obama for a Pre-Valentine’s Day Dinner in San Francisco on February 13, 2015.  The address and other details will be disseminated upon your RSVP.

Please visit my custom link at http://bit.ly/1Dye325 to RSVP.  Please contact Erik Stowe with any questions at stowee@dnc.org or (202) 488-5096. Many thanks!

 

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